My Reading in January 2019

My January reading wrap-up includes fewer books than I would have liked, but that’s what happens when a new semester begins! I'm teaching three new courses, so preparing for those has been time consuming. Here are my five-word reviews of what I read in January. They Were Sisters by Dorothy Whipple: adulting is hard; cruelty... Continue Reading →

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My Favorite Reads of 2018

My top reads of 2018 include six books (well, eight of you count the three Kristin Lavransdatter books separately). I wanted to have a top ten or a top five, but this is how it turned out. Becoming (2018) by Michelle Obama Milk and Honey (2014) by Rupi Kaur The Star Side Of Bird Hill (2015) by Naomi... Continue Reading →

A Few Firsts

I experienced a few firsts on Christmas Eve. First Number One I read A Christmas Carol (1843) by Charles Dickens for the very first time. I had never read it because I kept telling myself that I already know the story, so what is the point? I have images of Donald Duck, Goofy, and Mickey Mouse... Continue Reading →

What I Read in October 2018

Here’s what I read last month in five-word reviews. I did a lot of academic reading in October for an upcoming research trip to South African and Botswana.   Now We Are Six by A. A. Milne: cute poems for Pooh lovers This Mournable Body by Tsitsi Dangarembga: after war woman wanders, falters Rubyfruit Jungle... Continue Reading →

What I Read in September 2018

Here is my September reading in in five-word reviews. It was a good month! The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro: lovely reread; regrets are haunting Living a Feminist Life by Sara Ahmed: casually written brilliant caring theory The Will to Change: Men, Masculinity, and Love by bell hooks: empathetic critique of toxic masculinity... Continue Reading →

Silences

I've been pretty silent on social media lately, and on this blog. I used to speak up about current events, social practices, academic theory, morality, etc. But for the last two years, I haven't spoken up. I'm not sure why. There's a lot of discomfort within me because of this. After reading Rhetoric Retold: Regendering... Continue Reading →

Reading Internationally

When I was working on my Master's degree, I took a world literature class in which we read books by Anita Desai (Indian), Khaled Hosseini (Afghan-born American), and Edna O'Brien (Irish). I've also engaged with more popular and award-winning authors, like Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (Nigerian) and Jhumpa Lahiri (American of Indian origin). Nevertheless, I really... Continue Reading →

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