What I Read in April & May 2018

Here are my five-word book reviews of what I read this April and May. Here's April. đź“š Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman: Seems Lighthearted, Has a Twist đź“š Educated by Tara Westover: Journey Away from Messy Family (I can relate!) đź“š The Black Prince by Iris Murdoch: Comedy of Errors Meets Hamlet đź“š Thimble Summer by... Continue Reading →

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Literary Wives: Stay with Me by Ayobami Adebayo

Can marriage survive cultural expectations? That is the central question of Stay with Me (2017) by Ayobami Adebayo, the June 2018 read for the Literary Wives Series, hosted by these bloggers. Check out their posts on this book. Naomi of Consumed by Ink Kay of What Me Read Lynn of Smoke & Mirrors We attempt to understand and explore... Continue Reading →

Is Selfishness the Key to Happiness?

I’m sure most of us would immediately answer “no” to the question the title poses. I do. I think self-care and self-love are important in order to be able to share love and affection with others, but I don’t think selfishness leads to happiness. However, one of the characters of Anita Brookner’s Hotel Du Lac... Continue Reading →

A Little Du Maurier

I've read Rebecca (1938) by Daphne Du Maurier. It is a great book of suspense. I read it as part of the BBC book list that I was reading from when I started this blog. (I should get back to that.) I'm not sure why, but I stopped there with Du Maurier. I didn't think, "That... Continue Reading →

Literary Wives: Gaining Perspective on Zelda

I’ve always thought that Zelda Fitzgerald, wife of American author F. Scott Fitzgerald, was crazy.  In a bad way.  I dismissed her and often thought negatively of her.  This point of view is usually reinforced by what I’ve read about her, mostly fictional appearances, like in The Paris Wife by Paula McLain. But thanks to... Continue Reading →

I Have a Book Type

I’ve decided that there is a type of book that I like more than any other. It is a book that explores art/literature and artists/writers and that jumps back and forth between time. It is a book that includes old letters that somehow inform the present day of the characters. It is a book that... Continue Reading →

Literary Wives: There Is No One Way to Be a Woman

American Housewife (2016), a collection of short stories by Helen Ellis, is the Literary Wives bloggers' pick for this month. It is witty, poignant, hilarious, dark, timely, and accessible. Please see more of the Literary Wives discussion at the following blogs. Naomi of Consumed by Ink Kay of What Me Read Lynn of Smoke & Mirrors Ariel of One... Continue Reading →

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