Throwback Thursday: Charles Dickens, Spy Novelist

This post was originally published on January 12, 2012. Reading Dickens pleases my husband.  He has no idea that the first line of A Tale of Two Cities is, “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times,” yet I could detect his pleasure at seeing me sprawled out on the couch... Continue Reading →

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Contrivance in Hardy’s Far From The Madding Crowd

My favorite part of Thomas Hardy’s Far From the Madding Crowd (1874), number 47 on the BBC book list, is when the maltster at the local pub tells Gabriel Oak that despite the grittiness of the bacon they are about to eat, he can try not to chew too closely and therefore enjoy the meat... Continue Reading →

The One True Vampire Novel

I love Dracula (1897), number 72 on the BBC book list, by Bram Stoker.  It is one of my favorite books, and I have read it several times.  And I would read it again.  One of my favorite memories of these many readings is when I read it with my neighborhood book club in October.... Continue Reading →

Nobody Likes a Know-It-All

The Today Show recently fired Ann Curry from the top female anchor position.  Ever since she got the coveted job, she had been affected and stiff.  Her wardrobe had gone from normal to strange, but that is not a reason to fire somebody, and I contend that she is not the problem with the Today... Continue Reading →

The Best Quotes from Middlemarch

This is the third and final installment of my thoughts for Middlemarch Week.  If you missed post one, A Preview of Middlemarch, click here.  If you missed post two, George Eliot on Marriage, Human Nature, Money, Politics, Religion, Feminism, and Gossip in Middlemarch, click here.  If you’re sick of Middlemarch (1874), which is number 20... Continue Reading →

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