A Trip to Ireland

Last week, my husband and I were in Ireland. We visited because I had been accepted at an academic conference in Limerick. In fact, the paper I submitted with my colleague Breeanne ended up winning the Hayhoe Fellow Award, or the award for the best graduate student paper. We spent a day in Dublin. We... Continue Reading →

I Was Expecting More from This Book: Modern Motherhood

When I first came across Modern Motherhood: Women and Family in England, 1945-2000 (2012) by Angela Davis, I couldn't wait to get my hands on it. I eyed it for a few weeks, and then I broke down and ordered it. As soon as it arrived, I was so excited to read it. I even... Continue Reading →

More Girls’ Studies

Many of you may remember that last year, I took a girls' studies class, and regularly posted assignments to my blog.  You can see those past posts here. This semester, I'm teaching the same class!  I have two wonderful and articulate students, and I thought some of you might be interested in seeing their blogs... Continue Reading →

Witch Hunt

Original documents and manuscripts fascinate me, and much of my research as a Ph.D. student over the last few years has focused on historical sources and archival materials. That is why when I heard on NPR about Katherine Howe’s The Penguin Book of Witches (2014), a compilation of original sources about witches dating from 1582... Continue Reading →

Examining the Rhetoric of Pregnancy

While researching for my dissertation proposal, I came across an academic study called The Rhetoric of Pregnancy (2014) by Marika Seigel. I read it eagerly, for information about women’s experiences with pregnancy and work and as a representative sample of a dissertation turned book.  From what I gathered, this project was Seigel’s dissertation in my... Continue Reading →

More Work for Mother

A social rhetoric surrounding household technologies, such as the dishwasher, is that these devices are “labor-saving.” Ruth Schwartz Cowan (1983) argued that this assumption of technology, especially technologies made for domestic work, is wrong. She instead posited that so-called labor-saving devices have actually increased work for women. Cowan traced household technologies in detail from industrialism,... Continue Reading →

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