Literary Wives: Wife 22

I didn’t read Wife 22 (2012) by Melanie Gideon.  I tried.  I did.  But I couldn’t get past the first chapter.

I also spent this weekend taking comprehensive exams for my Ph.D. program, which I’m finishing up this morning, so if that works as an excuse for today’s lack of a post, there it is.  I’ve got until 11 a.m. this morning to turn in both of the essays I’ve been working on this weekend to prove that I know my breadth and depth in the field of professional and technical communication.

Wife 22 cover

But don’t let my lack of enthusiasm for this book prevent you from joining the conversation with the other hosts of the Literary Wives series.  In this series, we read books with the word “wife” in the title and ask the following questions.

1. What does this book say about wives or about the experience of being a wife?

2. In what way does this woman define “wife”—or in what way is she defined by “wife”?

Visit the pages of the other participating bloggers to find out more about Wife 22.

Ariel of One Little Library

Carolyn O. of Rosemary and Reading Glasses

Cecilia of Only You

Lynn of Smoke & Mirrors

Kay of What Me Read

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33 thoughts on “Literary Wives: Wife 22

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  1. Hi, Emily, did you not read it because you didn’t like it or because you just didn’t have time. I have to admit, I don’t think I would have picked it if I had known just how chick littish it was, although for very light reading, it was okay.

    1. Both. I tried to read it and couldn’t get into it, and then it was like, “Well, I really need to study for my exams and write my dissertation proposal anyway…”

      1. Well, I can’t say that you missed that much. It was more of the type of thing you read when you are at the beach! A little better than the general run of chick lit because it was funny.

  2. Good luck! And it will be okay — you’re brilliant!

    I agree with Kay, by the way — you’re not missing much here, though for the beach it would be pleasant reading.

  3. Understandable that you didn’t have time. My husband just completed this process several years ago and it is all-consuming and grueling, at best! I’m certain you will be at the top of the heap!! 🙂

  4. Emily, best wishes on your Ph.D essays and test. I hope they went well and you are happy with your efforts. I am sure you are glad to have those parts behind you. As for the book, is the title indicative of the plot – 22 wives? All the best, BTG

    1. Bth5885: Your question regarding the title… Actually, when Alice agrees to participate in an anonymous survey about marriage, she is assigned “wife 22” as her identifier for that survey. Now…22 wives would have definitely been a totally different book, I’m pretty sure! 😀

  5. Good luck and Congratulations on your comprehensive exam and pursuing your PhD! What an accomplishment! I’ve done it for a Master’s degree, and I’m thinking about pursuing my own PhD in Folklore someday. I remember what those essays and tests were like, and for a PhD — Whew! — they’ve got to be at least 100x harder. That is definitely a viable reason for not reading the novel. 🙂

    1. Thanks! You should pursue a PhD. Lots of fun! 😉 Folklore would be awesome. We have a decent folklore program at the Master’s level at my school, but I know there are PhD programs elsewhere that are pretty great.

      1. I’ve been looking into the University of Missouri because they also have a Master’s of Library Science that I’d like to pursue before jumping into the Folklore PhD. Which school do you attend?

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