Lines for Adults in Curious George

My two-year-old recently turned three, and it looks like she has finally grown out of wanting to watch episodes of Curious George over and over and over (and over).  They are all on Netflix, and I think we have seen each episode of all five seasons at least ten times.  I’m not exaggerating.

We considered have a Curious George–themed birthday party for her, but she is also a big fan of Buzz Lightyear, so we went the Toy Story route.  We also like to do piñatas, and we decided that disfiguring Curious George probably wouldn’t be the best idea.  Here’s why.

When my oldest daughter turned three, she too had a fascination with Curious George.  We bought a George piñata, gathered with family and friends at a local park, and we watched as all of the children beat George to a pulp.  At first, Olivia was excited.  It was fun to try to hit the moving monkey with a stick.  Then, as she saw him begin to fall apart, dread spread across her face.  She began quietly moaning and whimpering and nervously rubbing her neck.  Suddenly, she was holding George’s severed arm in her hands, and that’s when she lost it.  She became hysterical; her favorite animal character was now falling apart.  We have the whole thing on video.  It’s pretty funny (and sad, yes so sad).  We learned our lesson that time.

Here’s a picture of it.  The video is much funnier.  (And that’s my friend Cyndi in the blue shirt.  She’s AWESOME.)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

So, no George for Daphne’s party.  We instead ordered a Buzz Lightyear piñata.  How did she react?

She was actually fine.  She loved it.  There may be several reasons for this, but I’m thinking it has to do (mostly) with the fact that she has an older sister and has seen and heard a lot more than Olivia had at age three.

All of this partying reminded me of the fun part of being a parent.  I don’t love knowing all of the lines to every child’s movie, but sometimes there are hilarious bits thrown in just for adults.  I’m not talking ridiculous and crude bits, like in Shrek (which I can’t stand), but I’m talking just funny wording and inside-type jokes to make sure that parents aren’t completely bored when viewing this juvenile entertainment with their little ones.

Here are some of my favorite lines from the Curious George television show on PBS.

“No one on earth is more ready, or more normal.  Just ask my monkey!” —The Man in the Yellow Hat

“Please do not shake up that nice dog!” —The Lady at the Animal Shelter

“Gosh, your baby looks like my monkey . . . He’s a good looking monkey!” —The Man in the Yellow Hat

“Oscar made the finals in the pretty face competition for pigs!” —Mrs. Rankin

“George and dirt?  When would that man in the yellow hat ever learn.” —The Narrator, voiced by William H. Macy.

“Anybody seen a monkey carrying a vacuum cleaner?”

“Is he wearing a cape?”

“I don’t know.  Could there be more than one monkey with a vacuum in the city?” —The Man in the Yellow Hat and a passerby

“For centuries, people have wondered what squirrels dream about.” —The Narrator, voiced by William H. Macy

“I’ve wanted a hat like this ever since I saw a man with a monkey wearing one.” —The Garbage Man, after finding the yellow hat at the dump.

It really is a fun and cute show.  I wouldn’t watch it by myself.  In fact, I hope never to watch it again.  Instead, I hope to read more of the books, which are quite charming with beautiful illustrations.

curious george cover

Advertisements

21 thoughts on “Lines for Adults in Curious George

Add yours

  1. My niece’s daughter who just turned three visits often. She will point at the TV and ask for “George.” It wears you out, but she loves it. It does beat the heck out of the “Blues Clues” guy or “Teletubbies.”

    1. Good point. If we start comparing shows, George is pretty darn “good.” 🙂 It also claims to “teach” math and science, but given Hugh’s blog today, I’m not sure how accurate that is.

  2. I’ve been mercifully spared the tv series. My niece isn’t into it, she’s into Jake & the Neverland Pirates, which gives me a headache. But I love the Curious George books, particularly the illustrations!

  3. Watching some kid’s films now, including the ones I saw as a kid myself, make me realise how much intelligence really goes into them. Same for old Simpsons. I have memories of my parents laughing out loud and me just going “Huh?” Luckily, no nieces, nephews or kids around to make me watch and re-watch them. Cute story about your daughter. Must have been traumatic though. Apparently, when we went to Disney World when I was five, on seeing Chip and Dale I turned to my brothers and said “See, I told you they were real.”

  4. Well, between you and Neesha, I’m having a great day today! =) I have always loved the slow pace of the Curious George cartoons. I must say, however, that I recall reading Curious George books well before the cartoon debuted. That is likely why I have such a soft spot for him. Though not for his owners choice of clothing color. Who wears all yellow/all the time? It’s jarring! =)

  5. I am looking for some nice comics to read in between the serious reads, so I think I’ll read those Curious George comics 🙂 I’ll be happy if you can suggest more 😀

  6. When my kids were little, I used to fall asleep reading them Amelia Bedelia every night. I appreciated the humor but night after night….
    I am not a general fan of the Disney movies but have to admit that Hercules had a lot of adult humor/references that I enjoyed.

    1. Why must they hear the same books over and over? I have a vague memory of hearing that there are some developmental reasons for it. All I know is that I have some children’s books memorized because I said them aloud for at least two years each night!

  7. We have watched a few Curious George and read a few too. We also recently discovered a book called “Furious George Goes Bananas” – A primate parody. Josie really liked it even though she doesn’t understand the parody. I’m curious at what age children might understand the joke. Maybe Olivia might. 🙂 Either way, it’s kind of funny for parents.

Join the Conversation

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: